Print | Share | Calendar | Diocesan Locator
|   No Spanish version at this time
FOLLOW US  Click to go to Facebook.  Click to go to Twitter.  Click to go to YouTube.   TEXT SIZE Click to make text small. Click for medium-sized text. Click to make text large.  
 

Landmines Video List

 

These films are on file at the Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation. Copies can be obtained in exchange for a donation to the Foundation. For information, call their Communications Department, 202/483-9222.

Small Targets

Approximately 28 minutes
Recommended for high school, college and adults

This video focuses on how landmines disproportionately affect children who live in mined areas by illustrating a "vicious cycle" that begins when a child or a child's parent is injured by a landmine thereby forcing the child into a life of extreme poverty. Small Targets uses Mozambique as the primary example of a country affected by landmines. Speakers on the video include U.S. Senator Leahy, the Canadian Ambassador to the UN and members of NGO's involved with landmines. This video is useful because it focuses on a dimension of the landmine crisis which other video's tend to skim over.

Tiptoeing Not Knowing

Approximately 30 minutes
Recommended for upperclassmen (high school) and above

Tiptoeing Not Knowing gives an extremely thorough introduction to anti-personnel landmines and the problems they create. Demining efforts, the Ottawa Treaty and current ratification efforts are discussed as well. Various speakers, including Jody Williams and Bobby Muller (one of the founding members of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines) describe the impact of landmines in the regions where they are found. Also included are statements by President Clinton and the late Princess Diana. This video goes through the history of the landmines and the International Campaign to Ban Landmines and so it is ideal for anyone wanting a good introduction to the subject.

One Step at a Time

Approximately 24 minutes
Recommended for high school

The video, One Step at a Time, focuses on efforts to ban landmines, primarily those by the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. The video begins with tales from landmine survivors and how their plight led to the creation of this campaign. The video also illustrates the positive relationship between governments and non-governmental organizations, through scenes from the Ottawa Treaty signing. This video is ideal for persons interested in simply learning about landmines.

Landmines: Overcoming a Lethal Legacy

Approximately 10 minutes
Recommended for persons wanting to become involved in banning landmines.

This video provides a very general introduction to the problem of landmines, showing the impact of mines on the people of 'mined' countries (especially children), demining efforts, as well as the Ottawa Treaty and what governments are currently doing with regards to landmines. One aspect about this video worth taking note of is that it is somewhat propagandistic; the video appears to be better designed for people who are more interested in becoming involved, rather than those who just want to learn something about landmines. Furthermore, the Church World Service heavily emphasizes their own demining efforts.

Demining the Killing Fields

Approximate time: 25 minutes
Recommended for high school, college, above

This video pays particular attention to the refugee problem which has been one of the results of landmines. The focus of the video is on Cambodia; how the previous political situation with the Kamir Rouge led to the circumstances today. The current demining efforts are mentioned as well. This video is better for people who already know about landmines and are looking for more focused information although general information about landmines is given throughout the video.

 


By accepting this message, you will be leaving the website of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. This link is provided solely for the user's convenience. By providing this link, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops assumes no responsibility for, nor does it necessarily endorse, the website, its content, or sponsoring organizations.

cancel  continue