FOLLOW US  Click to go to Facebook.  Click to go to Twitter.  Click to go to YouTube.   TEXT SIZE Click to make text small. Click for medium-sized text. Click to make text large.  
 

Previous Meditations on Mercy

 

October 2016

Lk 15:1-32; MV, no. 9

"I tell you, in just the same way there will
be more joy in heaven over one sinner who
repents than over ninety-nine righteous
people who have no need of repentance."(Lk 15:7)

"In just the same way, I tell you, there
will be rejoicing among the angels of God
over one sinner who repents." (Lk 15:10)

"He said to him, 'My son, you are here
with me always; everything I have is
yours. But now we must celebrate and
rejoice, because your brother was dead
and has come to life again; he was lost
and has been found.'" (Lk 15:31-32)

In this chapter of Luke's Gospel, we hear three different parables of things that have been lost but are then found: the lost sheep (vv. 4-7), the lost coin (vv. 8-10), and the lost son (vv. 11-32). At the conclusion of each of these parables, the characters express joy over having found what was lost. In fact, they have a party to celebrate the return of what was lost! The Christian faith is not a gloomy faith—it is one of wondrous joy at the marvels God has worked in creation and his plan for our salvation. These parables show that the mercy of God is also a cause for joy. We rejoice that we are able to return to God even if we have lost our way. God and all of heaven rejoice when we turn our hearts back to God. Though there are serious aspects involved in our works of mercy and acts of compassion, we remain hopeful because we know the joy that occurs in the fullness of God's love and mercy.

As the Jubilee of Mercy draws to a close next month, these parables remind us that God is always seeking us out and rejoices when we return to him. Throughout this past year, we have journeyed to a deeper self-awareness of God's mercy acting in our lives and the way in which our actions demonstrate God's love to others. While
we may not have always acted with mercy, we are continually being found by God and drawn back into his loving mercy. In these parables, "mercy is presented as a force that overcomes everything, filling the heart with love and bringing consolation through pardon" (MV, no. 9). Even if we stray far from God, we can always come back, because God is eternally offering his love, mercy, and compassion to us. Like the lost son who realizes that his father will have mercy on him if he returns, it
may take us a while to open our hearts enough to recognize where God is offering his mercy to us. Nevertheless, that offer of mercy is always there, and God rejoices when we find our way back to him.

Reflection Questions

1.Do you take time to celebrate and rejoice in your relationship with God? Why do you think it is important to include this sense of joy in your Christian life? What does your family or parish community do to celebrate and acknowledge the mercy and love God has for those who return to their faith?

2. Think back to a time when you were lost or when you lost something. How did it feel when you made your way back to a place you knew or found what you were looking for? Can you imagine God's response to your return to him or an opening of your heart more to receive his mercy? What would he say to you? How would you rejoice with him?

Moments of Mercy

Previous Meditations on Mercy


Octubre 2016

Lc 15:1-32; MV, no. 9

"Yo les aseguro que también en el cielo
habrá más alegría por un pecador que se
arrepiente, que por noventa y nueve justos,
que no necesitan arrepentirse". (Lc 15:7)
"Yo les aseguro que así también se alegran
los ángeles de Dios por un solo pecador
que se arrepiente". (Lc 15:10)
"El padre repuso: 'Hijo, tú siempre estás
conmigo y todo lo mío es tuyo. Pero era
necesario hacer fiesta y regocijarnos,
porque este hermano tuyo estaba muerto
y ha vuelto a la vida, estaba perdido y lo
hemos encontrado'". (Lc 15:31-32)

En este capítulo del Evangelio de Lucas, escuchamos tres parábolas diferentes de cosas que se han perdido pero luego son encontradas: la oveja perdida (vv. 4-7), la moneda perdida (vv. 8-10) y el hijo perdido (vv. 11-32). Al término de cada unade estas parábolas, los personajes expresan alegría
por haber encontrado lo que estaba perdido. De hecho, ¡hacen una fiesta para celebrar el regreso de lo que se perdió! La fe cristiana no es una fe sombría; es una fe de alegría fabulosa ante las maravillas que Dios ha obrado en la creación y su plan para nuestra salvación. Estas parábolas muestran que la misericordia de Dios es también un motivo de alegría. Nos regocijamos de poder regresar a Dios incluso si hemos perdido el camino. Dios y todo el cielo se regocijan cuando volvemos otra
vez nuestros corazones a Dios. Aunque nuestras obras de misericordia y actos de compasión incluyen aspectos serios, mantenemos la esperanza porque conocemos la alegría que se produce en la plenitud del amor y la misericordia de Dios.

A medida que el Jubileo de la Misericordia llega a su fin el próximo mes, estas parábolas nos recuerdan que Dios siempre está buscándonos y se regocija cuando regresamos a él. A lo largo de este último año, hemos viajado a una autoconciencia más profunda de la misericordia de Dios que actúa en nuestras vidas y la forma en que nuestras acciones demuestran el amor de Dios por los demás. Aunque tal vez no siempre hemos actuado con misericordia, continuamente somos encontrados por Dios y atraídos de regreso a su misericordia amorosa. En estas parábolas, "la misericordia se muestra como la fuerza que todo vence, que llena de amor el corazón y que consuela con el perdón" (MV, no. 9). Incluso si nos apartamos de Dios, siempre podemos volver, porque Dios está ofreciéndonos eternamente su amor, misericordia y compasión. Al igual que el hijo perdido que se da cuenta de que su padre tendrá misericordia de él si regresa, puede tomarnos un tiempo abrir nuestros corazones lo suficiente para reconocer dónde está Dios ofreciéndonos su misericordia. Sin embargo, esa oferta de misericordia siempre está ahí, y Dios se regocija cuando encontramos nuestro camino de regreso a él.

Preguntas Para La Reflexión

1. ¿Dedica usted tiempo a celebrar y regocijarse en su relación con Dios? ¿Por qué cree que es importante incluir este sentimiento de alegría en su vida cristiana? ¿Qué hace su familia o comunidad parroquial para celebrar y reconocer la misericordia y el amor que tiene Dios para los que regresan a su fe?

2. Piense en un momento en que se perdió o en que perdió algo. ¿Cómo se sintió cuando halló el camino de regreso a un lugar que conocía o encontró lo que buscaba? ¿Puede imaginar la respuesta de Dios a su retorno a él o una apertura de su corazón para recibir su misericordia? ¿Qué le diría él a usted? ¿Cómo se
regocijaría usted con él?

Momentos de Misericordia

Meditaciones Previas Sobre la Misericordia 


September 2016

Mt 9:35-38; MV, no. 8

"Jesus went around to all the towns and
villages, teaching in their synagogues,
proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom, and
curing every disease and illness. At the
sight of the crowds, his heart was moved
with pity for them because they were troubled
and abandoned, like sheep without
a shepherd. Then he said to his disciples,
'The harvest is abundant but the laborers
are few; so ask the master of the harvest to
send out laborers for his harvest.'"

It is a sad fact that we often become immune to the plight of the suffering. We pass those begging on street corners, step around people who are homeless and lying on the sidewalk, or ignore the look of hunger in the eyes of children. Sometimes we think, "Someone else will take care of them," or, "What can my five dollars do to change their situation," or even, "They should just go and get a job." In this passage that we read today, Jesus shows us in actions and words that it is not someone
else's responsibility but ours. As Jesus was passing through towns, he would see those who were sick and, moved with pity, stop to cure them. In Misericordiae Vultus, Pope Francis recalls several of Jesus' acts of mercy (e.g., Mt 14:13-21; Mt 15:32-39; Lk 7:11-17). In all of these examples, Jesus acts out of compassion for those who are in distress. As Pope Francis explains, "What moved Jesus in all of these situations was nothing other than mercy, with which he read the hearts
of those he encountered and responded to their deepest need" (MV, no. 8).

Not only should we follow Jesus' example in allowing our hearts to respond to the needs of others, but we should also listen to what Jesus calls us to: "The harvest is abundant but the laborers are few; so ask the master of the harvest to send out laborers for his harvest" (Mt 9:37-38). God calls on us to go out into our homes, workplaces, and communities and recognize his love and mercy working through others. God's harvest of mercy is rich and full; we must ask God to make us laborers in his field so that we can better recognize the love of God in others, especially in those we might normally walk past. This month, we celebrate a jubilee for workers and volunteers of mercy, something we all should strive to be. A contemporary example of someone who worked for mercy is Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta,
who responded to God's call for laborers. In her caring actions for those in the slums of Calcutta, Mother Teresa put into practice the actions of Christ and the call he makes to us all to labor with him. Our response to those who are suffering, like Mother Teresa's, should be one of love, compassion, and mercy.

Discussion Questions

1. In what way is God calling you to work as a laborer in his harvest? While Mother Teresa's life as a Missionary of Charity is an amazing example of acting with compassion toward others, her vocation is not for everyone. What is one thing you can do in your own community to respond to God's call? Consider becoming involved in one of your parish's outreach programs or a local service organization; approach this ministry with the same compassion Christ has for those he ministered to.

2. How can we pay better attention to those who are suffering in our communities instead of ignoring them? What are some things you can do so that your heart is more open to be moved with compassion for those who are suffering?

Moments of Mercy

Previous Meditations on Mercy


Septiembre 2016

Mt 9:35-38; MV, no. 8

"Jesús recorría todas las ciudades y los
pueblos, enseñando en las sinagogas, predicando
el Evangelio del Reino y curando
toda enfermedad y dolencia. Al ver a las
multitudes, se compadecía de ellas, porque
estaban extenuadas y desamparadas,
como ovejas sin pastor. Entonces dijo a
sus discípulos: 'La cosecha es mucha y los
trabajadores, pocos. Rueguen, por lo tanto,
al dueño de la mies que envíe trabajadores
a sus campos'".

Es un hecho triste que a menudo nos volvemos inmunes al drama de los que sufren. Seguimos de largo ante los mendigos de las esquinas, esquivamos a las personas que no tienen hogar y yacen en la acera, o ignoramos la mirada de hambre en los ojos de los niños. A veces pensamos: "Alguien máscuidará de ellos", o "¿Qué pueden hacer mis cinco dólares para cambiar su situación?", o incluso "Debieran ir a buscarse un trabajo". En este pasaje que leemos hoy, Jesús nos muestra en acciones y palabras que no es responsabilidad de otra persona, sino la nuestra. Cuando Jesús iba por los pueblos, veía a los que estaban enfermos y, conmovido, se detenía a curarlos. En Misericordiae Vultus, el papa Francisco recuerda varios de los actos de misericordia de Jesús (por ejemplo, Mt14:13-21; Mt 15:32-39; Lc 7:11-17). En todos estos ejemplos, Jesús actúa por compasión hacia los afligidos. Como explica el papa Francisco: "Lo que movía a Jesús en todas las circunstancias no era sino la misericordia, con la cual leía el corazón de los interlocutores y respondía a sus necesidades más reales" (MV, no. 8).

No sólo debemos seguir el ejemplo de Jesús al dejar que nuestros corazones respondan a las necesidades de los demás, sino que también debemos escuchar lo que Jesús nos llama a hacer: "La cosecha es mucha y los trabajadores, pocos. Rueguen, por lo tanto, al dueño de la mies que envíe trabajadores a sus campos" (Mt 9:37-38). Dios nos llama a ir a nuestros hogares, lugares de trabajo y comunidades y reconocer su amor y misericordia que obra a través de los demás. La cosecha de misericordia de Dios es rica y plena; debemos pedir a Dios que nos haga trabajadores en sus campos para que podamos reconocer mejor el amor de Dios en los demás, especialmente en aquellos a los que normalmente podríamos pasar de largo. Este mes, celebramos un jubileo para los trabajadores y voluntarios de la misericordia, algo que todos deberíamos esforzarnos por ser. Un ejemplo contemporáneo de alguien que trabajó para la misericordia es la beata Madre Teresa de Calcuta, que respondió al llamado de Dios por los trabajadores. En sus acciones al cuidado de los habitantes de los barrios pobres de Calcuta, la Madre Teresa puso en práctica las acciones de Cristo y el llamado que él nos hace a todos nosotros de trabajar con él. Nuestra respuesta a los que sufren, como la de la Madre Teresa, debe ser una respuesta de amor, compasión y misericordia.

Preguntas Para La Reflexión

1. ¿De qué manera está Dios llamándolo a trabajar como trabajador en su cosecha? Aunque la vida de la Madre Teresa como misionera de la Caridad es un ejemplo  asombroso de cómo actuar con compasión hacia los demás, su vocación no es para todos. ¿Qué cosa puede usted hacer en su propia comunidad para responder al llamado de Dios? Considere la posibilidad de participar en uno de los programas de acercamiento de su parroquia o una organización de servicio local; acérquese
a este ministerio con la misma compasión que tuvo Cristo por aquellos a los que ministró.

2. ¿Cómo podemos prestar más atención a los que sufren en nuestras comunidades en lugar de ignorarlos? ¿Qué cosas puede usted hacer para que su corazón sea más abierto a compadecerse por los que sufren?

Momentos de Misericordia

Meditaciones Previas Sobre la Misericordia 


 August 2016

Mt 5:1-12; MV, no. 9

"Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is
the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are they
who mourn, for they will be comforted.
Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit
the land. Blessed are they who hunger and
thirst for righteousness, for they will be
satisfied. Blessed are the merciful, for they
will be shown mercy. Blessed are the clean
of heart, for they will see God. Blessed are
the peacemakers, for they will be called
children of God. Blessed are they who are
persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for
theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are
you when they insult you and persecute
you and utter every kind of evil against
you [falsely] because of me. Rejoice and
be glad, for your reward will be great in
heaven." (Mt 5:3-12a)

In these ten verses, the word "blessed" is used nine times. That's a lot of blessings! This passage is commonly referred to as the Beatitudes and begins Matthew's account of the Sermon on the Mount. So what does beatitude mean, and what does it mean to be blessed? According to the USCCA, "Beatitude refers to a state of deep happiness or joy" (p 308). "The Beatitudes teach us the final end to which God calls us: the Kingdom, the vision of God, participation in the divine nature,
eternal life, filiation, rest in God" (Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 1726). This passage from Matthew helps us see how our actions are directed toward our eternal goal of sharing in the Kingdom of God. Like the corporal and spiritual works of mercy, the Beatitudes help us form our moral lives and illustrate that the foundation of these actions is the love of God. They also give us hope—hope in the love and mercy of God that is present on earth and that we will experience in the fullness of heaven. Even though it may be challenging to live out these values, it is important to remember that we find solace in God and will be blessed for our
efforts on behalf of the Kingdom of God.

In particular, the Beatitude, "Blessed are the merciful, for they will be shown mercy" (Mt 5:7), reminds us of our goal for this Jubilee of Mercy to be "merciful like the Father." If we allow our actions to be informed by the mercy of God, then they will naturally help lead us to our beatitude, life eternal with God in the Kingdom. When we incorporate the mercy of God into our lives, our actions reveal to others the love of God. We see this in the ministry of Jesus. When Jesus heals the sick and cares for those on the fringes of society, he is living out the Beatitudes. In these actions, Jesus directs people toward God and invites them to live out the mercy of God in their own lives. By approaching God with a humble heart, having compassion for the sufferings of others, actively seeking peace and what is just, and following the will of God in our lives, we shape our attitudes and habits in imitation of the face of God's mercy, Christ.

Discussion Questions

1. What are some commonalities that you see between the corporal and spiritual works of mercy and the Beatitudes? How can the attitudes of life that are seen in the Beatitudes help you in living out the love of God?

2. Describe a time when you have been challenged because of your decision to live out your faith. Was there a person confronting you, or were you being challenged by your own fears? How did you respond, and what are some ways that the Beatitudes can help you overcome this challenge?

Moments of Mercy


Agosto 2016

Mt 51-12; MV, no. 9

"Benditos los pobres de espíritu, porque
de ellos es el Reino de los cielos. Benditos
los que lloran, porque serán consolados.
Benditos los sufridos, porque heredarán
la tierra. Benditos los que tienen hambre
y sed de justicia, porque serán saciados.
Benditos los misericordiosos, porque obtendrán
misericordia. Benditos los limpios de
corazón, porque verán a Dios. Benditos
los que trabajan por la paz, porque se les
llamará hijos de Dios. Benditos los perseguidos
por la justicia, porque de ellos es el
Reino de los cielos. Benditos serán ustedes
cuando los injurien, los persigan y digan
cosas falsas de ustedes por causa mía.
Alégrense y salten de contento, porque
su premio será grande en los cielos".
(Mt 5:3-12a)

En estos diez versos, la palabra "benditos" se utiliza nueve veces. ¡Son bastantes bendiciones!A este pasaje se le denomina comúnmente las Bienaventuranzas y comienza el relato de Mateo del Sermón de la Montaña. Así pues, ¿qué significa  bienaventuranza, y qué significa ser bendecido? Según el Catecismo Católico de los Estados Unidos para los Adultos (USCCA, por sus siglas eninglés), "La palabra Bienaventuranza se refiere a un estado de gran prosperidad y alegría" (p. 326).  "Las bienaventuranzas nos enseñan el fin último alque Dios nos llama: el Reino, la visión de Dios, la participación en la naturaleza divina, la vida eterna, la filiación, el descanso en Dios" (Catecismo de la Iglesia Católica, no. 1726). Este pasaje de Mateo nos ayuda a ver cómo nuestras acciones se dirigen hacia nuestra meta eterna de participar del Reino de Dios. Al igual que las obras de misericordia corporales y espirituales, las Bienaventuranzas nos ayudan a formar nuestras vidas morales y a ilustrar  que el fundamento de estas acciones es el amor de Dios. También nos dan esperanza: esperanza en el amor y misericordia de Dios que está presente en
la tierra y que experimentaremos en la plenitud de los cielos. Aunque puede constituir un desafío vivir estos valores, es importante recordar que encontramos consuelo en Dios y seremos bendecidos por nuestros esfuerzos en favor del Reino de Dios. 

En particular, la bienaventuranza "Benditos los misericordiosos, porque obtendrán misericordia" (Mt 5:7) nos recuerda nuestra meta para este Jubileo de la Misericordia de ser "misericordiosos como el Padre". Si permitimos que nuestras acciones sean conformadas por la misericordia de Dios, entonces ellas naturalmente ayudarán a llevarnos a nuestra bienaventuranza, la vida eterna con Dios en el Reino. Cuando incorporamos la misericordia de Dios en nuestras vidas, nuestras acciones revelan a los demás el amor de Dios. Esto lo vemos en el ministerio de Jesús. Cuando Jesús cura a los enfermos y cuida de los marginados de la sociedad, él está viviendo las Bienaventuranzas. En estas acciones, Jesús dirige a la gente hacia Dios y la invita a vivir la misericordia de Dios en sus propias vidas. Al acercarse a Dios con el corazón humilde, tener compasión por los sufrimientos de los demás, buscar activamente la paz y lo que es justo, y seguir la voluntad de Dios en nuestras vidas, damos forma a nuestras actitudes y hábitos en imitación del rostro de la misericordia de Dios, Cristo.

Preguntas Para La Reflexión

1. ¿Qué características comunes ve usted entre las obras de misericordia corporales y espirituales y las Bienaventuranzas? ¿Cómo pueden las actitudes de la vida que se ven en las Bienaventuranzas ayudarle a vivir el amor de Dios?

2. Describa un momento en que se vio ante un desafío por su decisión de vivir su fe. ¿Hubo una persona que se enfrentaba con usted, o se vio usted ante un desafío por sus propios miedos? ¿Cómo respondió, y de qué maneras pueden las Bienaventuranzas ayudarle a superar este desafío?

Momentos de Misericordia


June 2016

Mt 25:31-45; MV, no. 15

"Then the king will say to those on his
right, 'Come, you who are blessed by
my Father. Inherit the kingdom prepared
for you from the foundation of the
world. For I was hungry and you gave
me food, I was thirsty and you gave me
drink, a stranger and you welcomed me,
naked and you clothed me, ill and you
cared for me, in prison and you visited
me.' Then the righteous will answer
him and say, 'Lord, when did we see
you . . . ?' . . . And the king will say to them
in reply, 'Amen, I say to you, whatever
you did for one of these least brothers of
mine, you did for me.'" (Mt 25:34-37, 40)

During this month, the Church celebrates a Jubilee for people who are ill or who have disabilities. In a special way this month then, we pray for and celebrate with people who struggle with a disability, whether visible to others or not. Because of  the variety of disabilities and illnesses, we are not always aware of those who are suffering. However, we are called to show love to those who are suffering, even if we do not fully understand or know their suffering. This passage from Matthew's Gospel is a good illustration of how we are called to serve Christ by serving others, no matter the situation. The righteous ones are praised and rewarded for showing mercy and compassion to those who are suffering. The king (Christ) identifies with those who are suffering. In a special way, Christ is with those who suffer or are on the margins of society. Just as those in the story of the final judgment did not recognize Christ but still acted out of compassion for their brothers and sisters in need, so too should we act compassionately toward everyone we encounter. 

In Matthew's Gospel, Jesus tells his disciples about what is to come in the Last Judgment. After a lengthy discourse of lessons and parables, we have, in Matthew 25:31-45, a description of the final judgment. The king will separate the "sheep" from the "goats," based on the criteria of what we now refer to as the corporal works of mercy. These works are integral to our ability to live out the Christian faith. Additionally, the Church encourages us to go beyond these physical acts of mercy by also incorporating into our daily lives the spiritual works of mercy. These works include "to counsel the doubtful, instruct the ignorant, admonish sinners, comfort the afflicted, forgive offenses, bear patiently those who do us ill, and
pray for the living and the dead" (MV, no. 15). These works of mercy are things that can and should be done on a daily basis. The spiritual nature of these works allows them to be integrated into our daily prayer life. We can also incorporate them into all of our actions toward others, so that, even if we do not know someone is suffering, by living out these spiritual works of mercy, we are able to respond as Christ would and see the love Christ has for all in them.

Discussion Questions

1. For a variety of reasons, we sometimes hide our own suffering from others. Yet the spiritual works of mercy show us that, as Christians, we ought to support and encourage all those who are suffering, for whatever reason. Take a moment today to reach out to someone and ask whether there is anything you can pray about for them. You can also ask someone to pray for you.

2. Many of the spiritual works of mercy are ones that we already do in our daily lives, for example, forgiving others, comforting those who are suffering, giving advice, or praying for the living and dead. Reflect on your day today, and identify times when you have lived out these works of mercy. Did you feel God's presence working in your actions and in the lives of those involved? What are some ways that you can be more intentional about or conscious of doing these works of mercy so that you can recognize the face of Christ more clearly in those you meet?



Junio 2016

Mt 25:31-45; MV, no. 15

"Entonces dirá el rey a los de su derecha:
'Vengan, benditos de mi Padre; tomen
posesión del Reino preparado para ustedes
desde la creación del mundo; porque estuve
hambriento, y me dieron de comer; sediento,
y me dieron de beber; era forastero,
y me hospedaron; estuve desnudo, y me
vistieron; enfermo, y me visitaron; encarcelado,
y fueron a verme'. Los justos le
contestarán entonces: 'Señor, ¿cuándo
te vimos . . . ?' . . . Y el rey les dirá: 'Yo
les aseguro que, cuando lo hicieron con
el más insignificante de mis hermanos,
conmigo lo hicieron'". Mt 25:34-37, 40)

Durante este mes, la Iglesia celebra un jubileo para las personas enfermas o discapacitadas. De manera especial este mes, entonces, oramos y celebramos con las personas que luchan con una discapacidad, sea visible para los demás o no. Debido a la variedad de discapacidades y enfermedades, no siempre somos conscientes de los que sufren. Sin embargo, estamos llamados a mostrar amor a los que sufren, incluso si no comprendemos o no conocemos plenamente su sufrimiento. Este pasaje del Evangelio de Mateo es una buena ilustración de cómo estamos llamados a servir a Cristo sirviendo a los demás, sin importar la situación. Los justos son elogiados y recompensados por mostrar misericordia y compasión a los que sufren. El rey (Cristo) se identifica con los que sufren. De manera especial, Cristo está con los que sufren o están marginados de la sociedad. Del mismo modo que los de la historia del juicio final no reconocieron a Cristo sino que actuaron por compasión por sus hermanos y hermanas necesitados, así también debemos nosotros actuar con compasión hacia todos los que encontremos. 

En el Evangelio de Mateo, Jesús habla a sus discípulos sobre lo que está por venir en el Juicio Final. Después de un largo discurso de lecciones y parábolas,  tenemos, en Mateo 25:31-45, una descripción del juicio final. El rey separará las "ovejas" de las "cabras", con base en los criterios de lo que ahora denominamos obras de misericordia corporales. Estas obras son parte integral de nuestra capacidad de vivir la fe cristiana. Además, la Iglesia nos anima a ir más allá de estos actos físicos de misericordia incorporando también en nuestras vidas cotidianas las obras de misericordia espirituales. Estas obras incluyen "dar consejo al
que lo necesita, enseñar al que no sabe, corregir al que yerra, consolar al triste, perdonar las ofensas, soportar con paciencia las personas molestas, rogar a Dios por los vivos y por los difuntos" (MV, no. 15). Estas obras de misericordia son cosas que se pueden y se deben hacer diariamente. La naturaleza espiritual de estas obras les permite integrarse en nuestra vida de oración diaria. También podemos incorporarlas en todas nuestras acciones hacia los demás, de modo que, incluso si no sabemos que alguien está sufriendo, al vivir estas obras de misericordia espirituales podemos responder como lo haría Cristo y ver en ellas el amor que Cristo tiene por todos.

Preguntas Para La Reflexión

1. Por una diversidad de razones, a veces escondemos de los demás nuestro propio sufrimiento. Sin embargo, las obras de misericordia espirituales nos muestran que, como cristianos, debemos apoyar y animar a todos los que sufren, por cualquier razón. Dedique un momento hoy a acercarse a alguna persona y preguntarle si hay algo sobre lo cual puede usted orar por ella. También puede pedirle a alguien que ore por usted.

2. Muchas de las obras de misericordia espirituales ya las hacemos en nuestras vidas cotidianas, por ejemplo, perdonar a otros, consolar a los que sufren, dar consejos o rezar por los vivos y los muertos. Reflexione sobre su jornada de hoy, e identifique ocasiones en que ha vivido estas obras de misericordia. ¿Sintió la presencia de Dios obrando en sus acciones y en las vidas de los implicados? ¿De qué maneras puede usted tener una intención o conciencia más clara de hacer estas obras de misericordia de modo que pueda reconocer el rostro de Cristo con mayor nitidez en las personas con que se encuentre?

 


April 2016

Heb 2:17-18; 4:16; MV, no. 18

"[T]herefore, he [Jesus] had to become like
his brothers in every way, that he might be
a merciful and faithful high priest before
God to expiate the sins of the people.
Because he himself was tested through
what he suffered, he is able to help those
who are being tested." (Heb 2:17-18)

"So let us confidently approach the
throne of grace to receive mercy and to
find grace for timely help." (Heb 4:16)

At the beginning of Lent, Pope Francis sent out Missionaries of Mercy to various countries throughout the world. These priests were sent out to proclaim God's love and be witnesses to God's mercy through the celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation. This sacrament is a very visible and tangible sign of God's mercy. As we see in the previous passages, because of God's great love for us, Christ became like us every way except for sin.In doing so, Christ became the High Priest who is merciful and "expiate[s] the sins of the people"(Heb 2:17). Just as we are tested and suffer in this lifetime, so also Christ was tested and endured suffering. Christ knows our struggles, our pain,and our sorrows and wants to draw us into the healing embrace of the merciful Father, which we experience every time we participate in the sacraments through Christ's Paschal Mystery. It is not only these priests who are being called in this Jubilee of Mercy to go out and witness to the Good News of Jesus Christ's mercy and compassion but all Christians.

Reflection Questions

1. During Lent, the Sacrament of Reconciliation is often emphasized, and many people participate in its wonderful mercies. However, it is not just a Lenten practice! This month, take some time to reflect on the connection between mercy, forgiveness, and spreading the Good News of Christ's Resurrection. How does your participation in the Sacrament of Reconciliation prepare you to receive God's mercy and then share it with others?2. In what ways can you be a "missionary of mercy" to others in your home, work, and community? What are particular qualities of Christ, in his life, Death, and  Resurrection, that you can model for others so that they can draw closer to the love of God?



Abril 2016

Hb 2:17-18; 4:16; MV, no. 18

"[Pues] [Jesús] tuvo que hacerse semejante
a sus hermanos en todo, a fin de llegar a
ser sumo sacerdote, misericordioso con
ellos y fiel en las relaciones que median
entre Dios y los hombres, y expiar así
los pecados del pueblo. Porque él mismo
fue probado por medio del sufrimiento,
puede ahora ayudar a los que están
sometidos a la prueba". (Hb 2:17-18)

"Acerquémonos, por tanto, con plena confianza,
al trono de la gracia, para recibir
misericordia, hallar la gracia y obtener
ayuda en el momento oportuno". (Hb 4:16)

Al comienzo de la Cuaresma, el papa Francisco envió Misioneros de la Misericordia a diversos países en todo el mundo. Estos sacerdotes fueron enviados a anunciar el amor de Dios y ser testigos de la misericordia de Dios a través de la celebración del Sacramento de la Reconciliación. Este sacramento es un signo muy visible y tangible de la misericordia de Dios. Como vemos en los pasajes anteriores, debido al gran amor de Dios por nosotros, Cristo se hizo semejante a nosotros en todos los sentidos excepto en el pecado. De este modo, Cristo se convirtió en el Sumo Sacerdote que es misericordioso y "expía los pecados del pueblo" (Hb 2:17). Así como somos probados y sufrimos en esta vida, así también Cristo fue probado y soportó sufrimiento. Cristo conoce nuestras luchas, nuestros dolores y nuestras penas, y quiere atraernos hacia el abrazo curador del Padre misericordioso, que experimentamos cada vez que participamos en los sacramentos a través del Misterio Pascual de Cristo. No son sólo los sacerdotes los que están siendo llamados en este Jubileo de la Misericordia a salir y dar testimonio de la Buena Nueva de la misericordia y compasión de Jesucristo, sino todos los cristianos.

A lo largo de este tiempo de Pascua, las lecturas de la Misa enfatizan que todos los cristianos deben compartir la Buena Nueva del amor de Dios: Cristo ha resucitado de entre los muertos, ¡aleluya! En estas lecturas, oímos que Cristo se aparece a los apóstoles y discípulos. Luego ellos son enviados una y otra vez a todo el mundo para difundir esta nueva a otras personas. Como cristianos bautizados, también nosotros somos enviados a compartir esta Buena Nueva con los demás. Dios, en su amor misericordioso, anhela nuestra salvación y nuestro retorno a él cuando nos alejamos del pecado. A medida que continuamos celebrando esta fiesta pascual, volvamos de nuevo a Dios a través de nuestras celebraciones sacramentales y viviendo el mensaje del Evangelio.

Preguntas Para La Reflexión

1. Durante la Cuaresma, el Sacramento de la Reconciliación suele enfatizarse, y mucha gente participa en sus maravillosas misericordias. Sin embargo, ¡no es sólo una práctica cuaresmal! Este mes, dedique algún tiempo a reflexionar sobre la conexión entre misericordia, perdón y difusión de la Buena Nueva de la Resurrección de Cristo. ¿De qué manera su participación en el Sacramento de la Reconciliación lo prepara para recibir la misericordia de Dios y luego compartirla con los demás?

2. ¿De qué maneras puede usted ser un "misionero de la misericordia" ante los demás en su hogar, trabajo y comunidad? ¿Cuáles son las cualidades particulares de Cristo, en su vida, Muerte y Resurrección, de las que puede usted ser modelo para los demás a fin de que puedan acercarse al amor de Dios?


March 2016

Heb 2:17-18; 4:16; MV, no. 18

"[T]herefore, he [Jesus] had to become like
his brothers in every way, that he might be
a merciful and faithful high priest before
God to expiate the sins of the people.
Because he himself was tested through
what he suffered, he is able to help those
who are being tested." (Heb 2:17-18)

"So let us confidently approach the
throne of grace to receive mercy and to
find grace for timely help." (Heb 4:16)

At the beginning of Lent, Pope Francis sent out Missionaries of Mercy to various countries throughout the world. These priests were sent out to proclaim God's love and be witnesses to God's mercy through the celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation. This sacrament is a very visible and tangible sign of God's mercy. As we see in the previous passages, because of God's great love for us, Christ became like us every way except for sin. In doing so, Christ became the High Priest who is merciful and "expiate[s] the sins of the people" (Heb 2:17). Just as we are tested and suffer in this lifetime, so also Christ was tested and endured suffering. Christ  knows our struggles, our pain, and our sorrows and wants to draw us into the healing embrace of the merciful Father, which we experience every time we participate in  the sacraments through Christ's Paschal Mystery. It is not only these priests who are being called in this Jubilee of Mercy to go out and witness to the Good News of  Jesus Christ's mercy and compassion but all Christians.

Throughout this Easter season, the Mass readings emphasize that all Christians must share the Good News of the love of God: Christ has risen from the dead, alleluia! In these readings, we hear of Christ appearing to the apostles and disciples. They are then sent out again and again to all the world to spread this news to others. As baptized Christians, we also are sent out to share this Good News with others. God, in his merciful love, longs for our salvation and our return to him when we turn away from sin. As we continue to celebrate this Easter feast, let us return to God again through our sacramental celebrations and living out the gospel message. 

Reflection Questions

1. During Lent, the Sacrament of Reconciliation is often emphasized, and many people participate in its wonderful mercies. However, it is not just a Lenten practice!  This month, take some time to reflect on the connection between mercy, forgiveness, and spreading the Good News of Christ's Resurrection. How does your  participation in the Sacrament of Reconciliation prepare you to receive God's mercy and then share it with others?

2. In what ways can you be a "missionary of mercy" to others in your home, work, and community? What are particular qualities of Christ, in his life, Death, and Resurrection, that you can model for others so that they can draw closer to the love of God?



Marzo 2016

Hb 2:17-18; 4:16; MV, no. 18

"[Pues] [Jesús] tuvo que hacerse semejante
a sus hermanos en todo, a fin de llegar a
ser sumo sacerdote, misericordioso con
ellos y fiel en las relaciones que median
entre Dios y los hombres, y expiar así
los pecados del pueblo. Porque él mismo
fue probado por medio del sufrimiento,
puede ahora ayudar a los que están
sometidos a la prueba". (Hb 2:17-18)

"Acerquémonos, por tanto, con plena confianza,
al trono de la gracia, para recibir
misericordia, hallar la gracia y obtener
ayuda en el momento oportuno". (Hb 4:16)

Al comienzo de la Cuaresma, el papa Francisco envió Misioneros de la Misericordia a diversos países en todo el mundo. Estos sacerdotes fueron enviados a anunciar  el amor de Dios y ser testigos de la misericordia de Dios a través de la celebración del Sacramento de la Reconciliación. Este sacramento es un signo muy visible y  tangible de la misericordia de Dios. Como vemos en los pasajes anteriores, debido al gran amor de Dios por nosotros, Cristo se hizo semejante a nosotros en todos los sentidos excepto en el pecado. De este modo, Cristo se convirtió en el Sumo Sacerdote que es misericordioso y "expía los pecados del pueblo" (Hb 2:17). Así  como somos probados y sufrimos en esta vida, así también Cristo fue probado y soportó sufrimiento. Cristo conoce nuestras luchas, nuestros dolores y nuestras  penas, y quiere atraernos hacia el abrazo curador del Padre misericordioso, que experimentamos cada vez que participamos en los sacramentos a través del Misterio Pascual de Cristo. No son sólo los sacerdotes los que están siendo llamados en este Jubileo de la Misericordia a salir y dar testimonio de la Buena Nueva de la  misericordia y compasión de Jesucristo, sino todos los cristianos.

A lo largo de este tiempo de Pascua, las lecturas de la Misa enfatizan que todos los cristianos deben compartir la Buena Nueva del amor de Dios: Cristo ha resucitado de entre los muertos, ¡aleluya! En estas lecturas, oímos que Cristo se aparece a los apóstoles y discípulos. Luego ellos son enviados una y otra vez a todo el mundo  para difundir esta nueva a otras personas. Como cristianos bautizados, también nosotros somos enviados a compartir esta Buena Nueva con los demás. Dios, en su amor misericordioso, anhela nuestra salvación y nuestro retorno a él cuando nos alejamos del pecado. A medida que continuamos celebrando esta fiesta pascual,  volvamos de nuevo a Dios a través de nuestras celebraciones sacramentales y viviendo el mensaje del Evangelio.

Preguntas Para La Reflexión

1. Durante la Cuaresma, el Sacramento de la Reconciliación suele enfatizarse, y mucha gente participa en sus maravillosas misericordias. Sin embargo, ¡no es sólo una práctica cuaresmal! Este mes, dedique algún tiempo a reflexionar sobre la conexión entre misericordia, perdón y difusión de la Buena Nueva de la Resurrección de Cristo. ¿De qué manera su participación en el Sacramento de la Reconciliación lo prepara para recibir la misericordia de Dios y luego compartirla con los demás?

2. ¿De qué maneras puede usted ser un "misionero de la misericordia" ante los demás en su hogar, trabajo y comunidad? ¿Cuáles son las cualidades particulares de Cristo, en su vida, Muerte y Resurrección, de las que puede usted ser modelo para los demás a fin de que puedan acercarse al amor de Dios?



February 2016

Mt 9:13; Ps 146:7-9; Ps 147:3, 6; MV, no. 6, 20

"Go and learn the meaning of the words, 'I
desire mercy, not sacrifice.' I did not come
to call the righteous but sinners." (Mt 9:13)

[It is the Lord who] "secures justice for the oppressed,
who gives bread to the hungry. 
The Lord sets prisoners free;
the Lord gives sight to the blind.
The Lord raises up those who are bowed down;
the Lord loves the righteous. 
The Lord protects the resident alien,
comes to the aid of the orphan and the widow,
but thwarts the way of the wicked." (Ps 146:7-9)

[The Lord is] "healing the broken hearted,
and binding up their wounds. . . .
The Lord gives aid to the poor,
but casts the wicked to the ground." (Ps 147:3, 6)

During Lent, we work to renew our lives through prayer, fasting, and almsgiving.  These disciplines help prepare us to celebrate the memorial of the Life, Death, and Resurrection of Christ at Easter.  Usually, we are encouraged to give something up (fasting from something) or make a certain sacrifice (for example, give up desserts or do service at a local shelter).  While these practices strengthen our spiritual lives, it is important that we are doing this with the right intention.  In Matthew's Gospel, Jesus tells the Pharisees that God desires mercy (Mt 9:13).  This is in opposition to the practice of empty sacrifices in which a person is merely going through the motions.  Those who make empty sacrifices are not making a real commitment to reestablishing their relationship with God by changing their lifestyle to reflect God's love and mercy. 

Our sacrifices must involve the proper attitude and action because God's mercy is not just an idea.  It is "a concrete reality through which he reveals his love as that of a father or a mother, moved to the very depths out of love for their child" (MV, 6).  The acts of kindness and compassion that we read about in Psalms 146 and 147 are actions that the Lord does.  God inspires his people to care for sick, the poor, the oppressed, the prisoner, and those who are suffering hardship.  Because God first loves us and shows us his compassion, we in turn are able to show compassion to our brothers and sisters.  These compassionate acts are especially seen in the corporal works of mercy (cf. Mt 25:31-46).  The corporal works of mercy include: "to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, welcome the stranger, heal the sick, visit the imprisoned, and bury the dead" (MV, 15).  During this Lenten season, let us strive to practice the corporal works of mercy with an attitude of mercy and compassion towards our neighbor so that others may experience the love of God through our actions.

Reflection Questions

1. What is one thing within each Lenten discipline of prayer, fasting, and almsgiving that you can do this Lent out of compassion?  Are there activities that you can do with friends, as a family, or with your parish?

2. Is there one particular Corporal Work of Mercy that you already participate in or would like to become involved with during this Jubilee of Mercy?  Why do you feel called to this particular act of mercy?  Reflect on your life and note any times that you have been on the receiving end of these mercies.  Continue passing on God's merciful love by checking with your local parish to see what sort of ministries are already offered that involve these corporal works of mercy and become involved with them.



Febrero 2016

Mt 9:13; Sal 145:7-9; Sal 146:3, 6; MV, no. 6, 20

"Vayan, pues, y aprendan lo que significa:
Yo quiero misericordia y no sacrificios.
Yo no he venido a llamar a los
justos, sino a los pecadores". (Mt 9:13)

[El Señor es quien] "hace justicia al
oprimido; / él proporciona pan a los
hambrientos / y libera al cautivo. / Abre
el Señor los ojos de los ciegos / y alivia al
agobiado. / Ama el Señor al hombre justo
/ y toma al forastero a su cuidado. / A la
viuda y al huérfano sustenta / y trastorna
los planes del inicuo". (Sal 145:7-9)

"El Señor sana los corazones quebrantados
/ y venda las heridas, / tiende su
mano a los humildes / y humilla hasta
el polvo a los malvados". (Sal 146:3, 6)


Durante la Cuaresma, trabajamos para renovarnuestras vidas a través de la oración, el ayuno y lalimosna. Estas disciplinas ayudan a prepararnospara celebrar el memorial de la vida, Muerte yResurrección de Cristo en la Pascua. Por lo general,se nos anima a renunciar a algo o ayunar dealgo (por ejemplo, renunciar a los postres) o hacerun cierto sacrificio (por ejemplo, hacer servicioen un refugio local). Si bien estas prácticas fortalecennuestras vidas espirituales, es importanteque las hagamos con la intención correcta. En elEvangelio de Mateo, Jesús dice a los fariseos queDios desea misericordia (Mt 9:13). Esto es contrarioa la práctica de sacrificios vacíos en queuna persona simplemente cumple con ritualesexternos. Los que hacen sacrificios vacíos no estánhaciendo un compromiso real para restablecersu relación con Dios cambiando su estilo de vidapara reflejar el amor y la misericordia de Dios.

Nuestros sacrificios deben implicar la actitudy la acción adecuadas, porque la misericordia deDios no es sólo una idea. Es "una realidad concretacon la cual Él revela su amor, que es como el deun padre o una madre que se conmueven en lomás profundo de sus entrañas por el propio hijo"(MV, no. 6). Los actos de bondad y compasión queleemos en los Salmos 145 y 146 son acciones queel Señor realiza. Dios inspira a su pueblo a cuidara los enfermos, los pobres, los oprimidos, losprisioneros y los que sufren privaciones. Porquees Dios el que primero nos ama y nos muestra sucompasión, nosotros, a nuestra vez, somos capacesde mostrar compasión a nuestros hermanos y hermanas.Estos actos de compasión se ven especialmenteen las obras de misericordia corporales (cf.Mt 25:31-46). Las obras de misericordia corporalesson "dar de comer al hambriento, dar de beber alsediento, vestir al desnudo, acoger al forastero,asistir los enfermos, visitar a los presos, enterrar alos muertos" (MV, no. 15). Durante este tiempo deCuaresma, esforcémonos por practicar las obras demisericordia corporales con una actitud de misericordiay compasión hacia el prójimo, para queasí otros puedan experimentar el amor de Dios através de nuestras acciones.

Preguntas Para La Reflexión

1. ¿Qué cosa dentro de cada disciplina cuaresmalde oración, ayuno y limosna puede ustedhacer esta Cuaresma por compasión? ¿Hayactividades que puede hacer con los amigos,como familia o con su parroquia?

2. ¿Hay una obra de misericordia corporalparticular en que usted ya participe o a la quele gustaría dedicarse durante este Jubileo dela Misericordia? ¿Por qué se siente llamado




January 2016

Mi 7:18-20; MV, no. 17

"Who is a God like you, who removes guilt
and pardons sin for the remnant of his inheritance;
Who does not persist in anger forever,
but instead delights in mercy,
And will again have compassion on us,
treading underfoot our iniquities?
You will cast into the depths of the sea all our sins;
You will show faithfulness to Jacob,
and loyalty to Abraham,
As you have sworn to our ancestors from days of old."

Happy New Year! January is often a month of new beginnings and new resolutions. In this Jubilee Year, we are asked to make acts of mercy a priority in our lives and to live out the compassionate love of God. In this passage from Micah, we are reminded of God's eternal promise to us. Throughout the Old Testament, we read stories of God's covenant that he made with his chosen individuals (through Noah, Abraham, and Moses). This covenant is more than a promise; it is also a relationship between God and his people. This relationship continues with the New Covenant, which is made through the life, Death, and Resurrection of Jesus, and with our participation in the New Covenant through the sacraments of the Church. God, who is ever faithful, will never break his covenant with us. Even if we fail or fall away, God still yearns for our return. 

Pope Francis highlights verses 18-19 as an illustration of God's compassion and mercy toward us. No person and no action can compare to the generous mercy and compassion that God has for us. Even though we may break our part of the covenant relationship, God pardons our sins because of his great love. God "delights in mercy"—God's merciful attitude is not a chore or a bother for God. Rather, pardoning sins and drawing people back into a relationship brings joy to God. As we make our annual resolutions, don't forget to include one about acting as God acts, with love and compassion to everyone we encounter. If you have trouble keeping this resolution, just remember that God will always keep his "resolutions"!

Reflection Questions

1. After reading about God's covenant with us and God's enduring love and compassion, what are some things we can do to strengthen our relationship with God? Why is it important for us to respond to God's covenant of love and mercy with our own actions of love and mercy? 

2. What is one realistic New Year's resolution you can make this year that will help you adopt the attitude of mercy? What are some things you can do that could help you stay on track in keeping this resolution throughout the year?


Enero 2016

Mi 7:18-20; MV, no. 17

"¿Qué Dios hay como tú, que quitas la
iniquidad / y pasas por alto la rebeldía
de los sobrevivientes de Israel? / No mantendrás
por siempre tu cólera, / pues
te complaces en ser misericordioso. /
Volverás a compadecerte de nosotros, /
aplastarás con tus pies nuestras iniquidades,
/ arrojarás a lo hondo del mar
nuestros delitos. / Serás fiel con Jacob / y
compasivo con Abraham, / como juraste
a nuestros padres / en tiempos remotos".

¡Feliz Año Nuevo! Enero suele ser un mes denuevos comienzos y nuevas resoluciones. Eneste Año Jubilar se nos pide hacer de las obras demisericordia una prioridad en nuestras vidas yvivir el amor compasivo de Dios. En este pasajede Miqueas se nos recuerda la eterna promesa quenos hizo Dios. A lo largo del Antiguo Testamento,leemos historias de la alianza que hizo Dios consus individuos elegidos (a través de Noé, Abrahamy Moisés). Esta alianza es más que una promesa;es también una relación entre Dios y su pueblo.Esta relación continúa con la Nueva Alianza, quese hace a través de la vida, Muerte y Resurrecciónde Jesús, y con nuestra participación en la NuevaAlianza a través de los sacramentos de la Iglesia.Dios, que es siempre fiel, nunca romperá sualianza con nosotros. Incluso si nosotros fallamoso nos alejamos, Dios sigue anhelandonuestro retorno.

El papa Francisco destaca los versículos 18-19como una ilustración de la compasión y misericordiade Dios para con nosotros. Ninguna personay ninguna acción se pueden comparar con lagenerosa misericordia y compasión que Dios tienepor nosotros. Aunque podamos romper nuestraparte de la relación de alianza, Dios perdonanuestros pecados a causa de su gran amor. Dios"se deleita en la misericordia"; la actitud misericordiosade Dios no es un deber o una molestiapara él. Por el contrario, perdonar pecados oatraer a la gente de regreso a una relación suscitaalegría en Dios. Al hacer nuestras resolucionesanuales, no olvide incluir una sobre actuar comoDios actúa, con amor y compasión por todos losque nos encontremos. Si tiene problemas paramantener esta resolución, ¡sólo recuerde que Diossiempre mantendrá sus "resoluciones"!

Preguntas Para La Reflexión

1. Después de leer sobre la alianza de Dios connosotros y el perdurable amor y compasión deDios, ¿qué cosas podemos hacer para fortalecernuestra relación con Dios? ¿Por qué esimportante que respondamos a la alianza deamor y misericordia de Dios con nuestras propiasacciones de amor y misericordia?

2. ¿Qué resolución realista de Año Nuevo puedeusted hacer este año que le ayude a adoptarla actitud de misericordia? ¿Qué cosas puedehacer que podrían ayudarle a seguir manteniendoesta resolución a lo largo del año?


December 2015

Lk 6:36; MV, nos. 13-14


"Be merciful, just as [also] your Father
is merciful. Stop judging and you will
not be judged. Stop condemning and
you will not be condemned. Forgive and
you will be forgiven. Give and gifts will
be given to you; a good measure, packed
together, shaken down, and overflowing,
will be poured into your lap. For the
measure with which you measure will
in return be measured out to you."

The Jubilee of Mercy begins this month!  As we strive to live out the mercy and love of God, we should take heart in the motto for the Jubilee of Mercy, "Merciful like the Father" (MV, 13-14).  What does it mean to be merciful like the Father – how is God merciful?  Throughout Scripture we see many examples of God's mercy, such as his judgement of individuals and nations.  Additionally, powerful examples are found in God's salvific actions throughout history – in the history of Israel in the Old Testament, in the prophets, in the Life, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension of Christ, in the sending of the Holy Spirit to the Church at Pentecost, etc.  Mercy is not just an act of clemency for those who have done wrong.  It is a way of life that is manifested in the compassion, love, and joy we see that God has for all of creation.          

While it is easy to see how God is merciful through the witness of the Scriptures and the life of the Church, it is sometimes challenging for us to apply it to our daily actions.  How do we live out what Christ calls us to in Scripture?  Our ability to live out this motto is dependent on our accepting God's superabundant love and mercy that he pours out on us.  Once we are nourished with God's mercy and allow His merciful love to transform us, we are better able to show others this merciful love (MV, 14).  Adopting a merciful attitude is not simply a spiritual action, it also includes physical acts that witness to God's love.  Luke 6:37-38 provides us with examples of how our actions can reflect the way that God treats us; through not judging or condemning, by forgiving others, and giving generously to others (MV, 14).  However, our actions of mercy are not simply things we do so that we will be judged worthy by God.  They are actions that flow from our embrace of God's mercy and love to us.  By showing mercy and love to others, we illustrate how we have accepted God's merciful love and how we want to continue this outpouring of mercy (MV, 14).

Reflection Questions

1. Where do I see God's love and mercy acting in my own life?  What is one way that I can receive these gifts from God and acknowledge them in my own spiritual life? 

2. What does it mean for me, or for my family, or for my parish, to be merciful as God is merciful?  How can I/we concretely express this merciful attitude that is grounded on the love of God? 


Diciembre 2015

Lc 6:36-38; MV, no. 13-14

"Sean misericordiosos, como su Padre es
misericordioso. No juzguen y no serán
juzgados; no condenen y no serán condenados;
perdonen y serán perdonados. Den
y se les dará: recibirán una medida buena,
bien sacudida, apretada y rebosante en los
pliegues de su túnica. Porque con la misma
medida con que midan, serán medidos".

¡El Jubileo de la Misericordia comienza estemes! Al esforzarnos por vivir la misericordia y elamor de Dios, debemos cobrar aliento en el lemadel Jubileo de la Misericordia, "Misericordiososcomo el Padre" (MV, nos. 13-14). ¿Qué significaser misericordiosos como el Padre; cómo es Diosmisericordioso? A lo largo de las Escrituras vemosmuchos ejemplos de la misericordia de Dios, comopor ejemplo su juicio de individuos y naciones.Además, se encuentran poderosos ejemplos enlas acciones salvíficas de Dios en la historia: enla historia de Israel en el Antiguo Testamento, enlos profetas, en la vida, Muerte, Resurrección yAscensión de Cristo, en el envío del Espíritu Santoa la Iglesia en Pentecostés, etc. La misericordiano es sólo un acto de clemencia para los que hanhecho mal. Es una forma de vida que se manifiestaen la compasión, el amor y la alegría que vemosque tiene Dios para toda la creación.

Si bien es fácil ver cómo es Dios misericordiosoa través del testimonio de las Escrituras y lavida de la Iglesia, a veces nos es difícil aplicarlo anuestras acciones diarias. ¿Cómo vivimos el llamadode Cristo en las Escrituras? Nuestra capacidadpara vivir este lema depende de que aceptemosel amor y misericordia sobreabundante de Dios que él derrama sobre nosotros. Una vez quenos alimentamos con la misericordia de Dios ypermitimos que su amor misericordioso nos transforme,somos más capaces de mostrar a los demáseste amor misericordioso (MV, no. 14). Adoptaruna actitud misericordiosa no es simplemente unaacción espiritual; también incluye obras físicasque den testimonio del amor de Dios. Lucas 6:37-38 nos da ejemplos de cómo nuestras accionespueden reflejar la manera en que Dios nos trata:no juzgando o condenando, sino perdonando a losdemás, y dando generosamente a los demás (MV,no. 14). Sin embargo, nuestras acciones de misericordiano son simplemente cosas que hacemospara ser juzgados dignos de Dios. Son accionesque se derivan de nuestra aceptación de la misericordiay el amor de Dios por nosotros. Al mostrarmisericordia y amor a los demás, ilustramos cómohemos aceptado el amor misericordioso de Dios y cómo queremos continuar esta efusión de lamisericordia (MV, no. 14).

Preguntas Para La Reflexión


1. ¿Dónde veo que el amor y la misericordia deDios actúa en mi propia vida? ¿Qué manerahay en que pueda recibir estos dones de Dios y reconocerlos en mi propia vida espiritual?

2. ¿Qué significa para mí, para mi familia opara mi parroquia ser misericordiosos como Dios es misericordioso? ¿Cómo puedo yo opodemos nosotros expresar concretamenteesta actitud misericordiosa que se basa en el amor de Dios?





By accepting this message, you will be leaving the website of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. This link is provided solely for the user's convenience. By providing this link, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops assumes no responsibility for, nor does it necessarily endorse, the website, its content, or sponsoring organizations.

cancel  continue